Hot New 2013 Goose Calls

The early goose season is just around the corner for most hunters and we took the liberty of searching around for the newest and hottest goose calls that were released for the 2013-2014 season.  Listed below in no particular order:

 

  • Field Proven’s Raptor - (Price Range: $30.00)

Raptor Poly

 

 

 

 

Field Proven released their Polycarbon goose call – Raptor.  Available in either Pearl or Blue. Shop Wing Supply.

 

  • Addicted Goose Calls - (Price Range: $140.00)

Addicted Goose Calls

 

 

 

 

Kelly’s Kalls – A call maker known for his Woodie Kall (Wood Duck call) and other fine wood calls released his Acrylic Addicted Goose Call line.  Available in Black or Pearl with different colored engraved logos.  Shop here.

 

  • Goey Calls Trainwreck – (Price Range $139.99)

Goey Trainwreck

 

 

 

 

Goey Calls release a big call in a small package.  The Trainwreck, available in either Orange Pearl or Green Pearl packs some unexpected notes.  Shop here.

 

  • Hayes Calls Meat Hook – (Price Range $79.95)

Meat Hook

 

 

 

 

Hayes Calls, known for their Bad AZZ call line combined the barrel of  their Bad Azz Goose call with a straight bore version of their Chain Gang Goose Call.   A great call with a lot of low end murmur.   Shop here.

 

  • Toxic Calls Angel De Morte’ – (Price Range $99.99)

Angel De Morte

 

 

 

Toxic Calls brings out their customizable Angel De Morte’ (Angel Of Death) with the guts at the bottom of the call and the longer barrel, you get the hollow sound of a Flute Call with the easy of operation of a Short Reed.  Shop here.

 

  • Real Calls Goose Call – (Price Range $135.00)

green-goose-call

 

 

 

Real Calls has introduced an odd but an effective goose call.  Featuring a ball-shaped designed insert makes the calls feel and sound different.  Shop here.

 

Gloves or Handwarmer

gloves-or-hwPre and post-season sales at your local sporting goods store and online offer some of the best prices and deals.  Every year I start to look for some items I just can’t live without, usually a new pair of gloves.   I have tried many different brands from the in-house brands of sporting goods stores to the rather expensive waterfowl-purpose gloves.  At the end of every season, I just can’t see myself using them again, they’re just not comfortable or there’s something I just don’t like about them.

Now don’t get me wrong, a pair of waterproof neoprene elbow length gloves is great to keep in your bag, but after recently purchasing an Avery handwarmer, I may never again buy a pair of gloves.  I purchased an Avery Outdoors Ducks Unlimited neoprene handwarmer .  This thing clips to your waders, has two Velcro pockets (elastic choke tube holders inside the right pocket), a zipper pocket on the back side with a smaller pocket inside (great for an iPhone), extra shell holders outside, belt just in case and is lined with a fleece lining.  Don’t want to forget about the waterproof seams also.

I would use two HotHand hand warmers for the inside and also have my wader pockets and jacket pockets (when my jacket is tucked into my waders) to help keep my hands warm.  Once I started using this new setup, I quit spending money on waterfowl gloves and more on other gear, like shells and beanies!

So we want to hear from you.  What is your preference, gloves or handwarmer?

New Shadow Grass Blades, The Latest Evolution in Waterfowl Patterns

The folks at Mossy Oak introduced their first waterfowl camo pattern back in 1986.  The pattern was Bottomland and it was designed to hide hunters in the flooded timber shadows by incorporating the dark and light patterns and colors of bark and soil.

Bottomland worked great in its intended environment, but it didn’t help hunters hide as well in the grass and cattails of pond edges and fields.  Mossy Oak’s design team recognized the need for a pattern that would work in these conditions and, in 1995, added blades of grass as an overlay to the Bottomland pattern to make a new pattern called Shadow Grass.  Now, there was a pattern that would work in almost any waterfowl hunting environment in North America.

Over the years, the Mossy Oak team has continued to enhance and improve their waterfowl patterns.  As digital imaging techniques improve, designers were able to add more detail and shadow to their patterns, giving them an almost 3D effect that broke up the human outline when viewed from any direction.

The evolution continued with improvements to Shadow Grass in both color and detail until the year 2007 when a new pattern named Duckblind was launched.  Duckblind was built on a base background of true dirt colors with different tones to represent wet and dry ground. Then, elements of millet, wild oats, corn stalks, phragmites, Johnson grass, soybeans and native grasses were added. The unique shadows enhance depth, while the muted shades of brown, tan, gray and soft black work well for blending into virtually any waterfowl environment across the country.

All of this leads to today and the introduction of the new Shadow Grass Blades pattern.  I asked Larry Moore, the Director of Research and Development for Mossy Oak Camo about the new pattern and what went into its design.  He replied, “The development of Blades took two years of research and element collection across the entire waterfowl flyway systems.  We carefully selected grass that was true to color and detail to represent any water edge or open field.  Because of the success and long run of original Shadow Grass we arranged the grass blades in a similar fashion and used a natural straw like background to utilize a naturally dirty look of mashed down or repeatedly flooded grass.  This created the look found in original Shadow Grass and allows the flooded timber hunter to use it as well as the field hunter.”

When I asked how they went about designing a pattern that works everywhere, Moore explained that the new Blades pattern has grass types found from Minnesota to Louisiana or California to New England.  These grasses were then carefully blended into a natural reproduction of some of the photos taken on location to match a wide array of settings. The precise arrangement of individual blades of grass, whether windblown, broken or bent, onto a background of thatch consisting of lesser or dead grass creates the perfect pure grass pattern. In addition, carefully placed shadows were added to create depth and further break up the human pattern. “Blades will work anywhere you have grass and dirt and I think that is everywhere”, Moore said.

After viewing the new pattern, I think it will blend perfectly into the pond edges and fields just about anywhere ducks and geese are hunted.  My biggest problem with darker waterfowl patterns is their tendency to blob out from a distance.  When viewed by a high flying duck or goose, that dark blob fairly screams “hunter”.  The overall light tone of the grasses blended with just enough shadow in the new Blades pattern should avoid that problem and help waterfowlers blend into just about any cover.

Swap Out

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Rating: 10/10 Comfort and Versatile.

As lanyards start to take a positive ascent in the world of game call accessories, one great manufacture continues to stay ahead of the game.  Heavy Hauler Outdoor Gear and their “Swap Out” lanyard has got to be the most versatile and comfortable quality lanyard I have ever worn.

Call lanyards have become extremely abundant during the last few years.  With social media at the aid, you can search Facebook and have more results than you could image.  For some people,  making lanyards has become just a hobby while others have started small businesses.  But for Heavy Hauler, lanyards are more than just that.  Heavy Hauler takes lanyards and mixes in some awesome innovation.  Mixing high-quality braiding, neoprene, clips and swivels to make the Swap Out one of the most desirable lanyards on the market today.

Contains strap and two detachable braided lanyards.

What comes in the package.

The Swap Out features a Neoprene neck strap (featuring Max-4 camo and premium stitching), 2 detachable braided sections (green & tan – black & tan),  8 braided call haulers (with clips so you can position them where you would like) allowing for 4 calls to be hanging and tangled free and an additional clip for a whistle.  Have the 2 braided sections allows you to carry 4 calls on the lanyard with 4 more in your blind/pit bag.

Heavy Hauler has an accessory for this great accessory, the Quick Attach Duck Straps.  They use the same clips as the call braided section, so within seconds you have switched from calls to ducks hanging around your neck.  Great for that day when you reach your limit!  Simply undo your calls from the neck strap and clip on the Duck Straps.   You are now  ready to carry your birds back to the truck!  Watch this video of Jason Bird (Owner) as he demonstrates how to do so.

The Swap Out has become one of the most popular and sought after call lanyards since it’s introduction into the waterfowl market.  If it doesn’t say,  ”Heavy Hauler”, it’s not the original Swap Out and can be found in retail stores for $34.99 which is an amazing price for such a versatile product and the Duck Straps are only $7.99!

I’m giving this lanyard a 10/10 simply because it’s everything I need with no complaints.  It’s just myself, this lanyard has been given an average of 4.8 stars from all the major sporting goods stores.

 

Duck Commander Shadow Single Reed Mallard Hen Call

Affordable & Effective.

Rating: 8/10 Jump aboard.

 

For a lot of us as duck hunters, choosing a duck call can be the hardest choice we come across. People have asked me in that past, “What is the best duck call”. My answer always sounded something like this, “I’m not sure I could ever answer that question.” Well, perhaps I might. Behind every great duck call is a duck caller.
Most duck hunters will stick with what has worked and proven it is duck killing worthy and I easily understand as well as respect that. As for myself, I like to try what’s new. I’m always thinking to myself, have they found something that works better?

Duck Commander released the all new Shadow Single Reed Mallard Hen Call in late 2012. A great mid-range single reed that is just as easy to blow and get used to as a double reed. Now I know what some of you seasoned duck hunters are thinking, here’s another single reed and I do not like single reeds. However, I do believe Duck Commander might have found a way to make the single reeds hang with the big boys. Being 4 3/4″ long, long reed board with a long wedge and just over an inch at it’s widest, the polycarbonate Shadow is great in size and allows you to easily be affective in executing quacks, feeding chuckle other cadences. It can certainly get quiet but with the long wedge it is difficult to break over when trying to hit the comeback notes.

Yes, the cost is low but don’t let the cost make you think you are getting what you are paying for.  A single reed that can sound great and is easy to use is worth more than $30, in my opinion. Jump onboard, because this ship isn’t sinking, JACK!